Inner Editor Feed

The Saga of Billy and Bill

Riptide reader Peter Loeb was browsing the news online September 6 when he spotted a Patch.com story (see it in boldface below) about Apple's new iPhone release party at the "Billy Graham Civic Auditorium" in San Francisco. As poor Bill Graham spun in his grave, Patch apparently caught the mistake and fixed it. Ah, the beauty of instant correction on the Internet; newspapers have to wait 24 hours to print corrections.

Apple iPhone 7 Event: Live Stream, What to Expect
Apple's annual event takes place at the Billy Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco Sept. 7.

By Feroze Dhanoa (Patch National Staff) - September 6, 2016 6:18 pm ET

Apple is widely expected to reveal the new version of the iPhone at its keynote Sept. 7, and speculation is swirling over what new features the signature phone will have. The event starts at 10 a.m. Pacific Time at the Billy Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco.

 


Keeping Up With the Changes

When my mom first got email, she always used all caps. It made sense—this is the woman who sent an actual telegram to my dorm room in college when I had gone a few weeks without calling. (None of us had ever seen one before.) When I suggest apps to her she tells me that her iPad only has Scrabble and Netflix on it, as if that is all it could ever do. She’ll never change. But, some institutions can, and do. The Associated Press announced recently that they will finally stop capitalizing “Internet,” reducing the cringe level of the English-using world by about 30%. And this week the National Weather Service tells us that they will “stop shouting”—i.e., issuing weather dispatches and warnings in all-caps. No more “HIGH SURF ADVISORY IN EFFECT,” just a more measured “High Surf Advisory in Effect.” They will still use all upper-case when a threat is imminent, or for advisories with international implications, but for the most part, expect your forecasts to be less panic-inducing and more conversational. So if these big institutions can change the ways that they talk about the internet and the way that they behave on it, why does it seem so hard for individuals to do the same thing? I don’t just mean my mom. Are there times when trolls become decent conversationalists? Could a constant self-promoter ever stop and read what others have to say? I wonder. I’d like to be hopeful. But for now my forecast is no.

Mikki Halpin on Twitter and Fusion.net